DELIVER



The DPP - Connectivity Supply to Production

The most graphically the troubled relationship between production and connectivity was laid bare in our 2016 survey report Connectivity and Production.

The Context
 
Five years ago the greatest barrier to end to end digital production was the continued existence of videotape in the content delivery process. The DPP did a huge amount to solve that problem by defining and implementing a file delivery specification.
But now there is a new barrier to overcome: the barrier to universal connected production. And it is not a problem that can be solved by the creation of a common specification.

There is barely a DPP output that doesn’t cite the constraining effect of connectivity on the move to online, cloud-based working. Most recently, connectivity emerged in the DPP 2017 Predictions as a significant brake on the trend towards cloud that is otherwise predicted to be the most important development of the next two years.

But most graphically the troubled relationship between production and connectivity was laid bare in our 2016 survey report Connectivity and Production.

Connectivity and Production revealed:

Around half of respondents reported that they still spent less than £1,000 per year on their connectivity despite the fact that most have experienced issues with reliability, speed and integrity of service.
More than 50% of production companies had experienced corrupt, stolen, lost or inaccessible content as a result of issues with their connectivity.

The typical indie has remained with the same supplier for the last five years, and regards changing supplier as a difficult challenge.
Paradoxically, while around two thirds of respondents claimed their office-based connectivity provision met most of their needs, almost the same number believe better services would make them more efficient.
 
So is the problem that production companies lack the understanding and the motivation to improve their connectivity? Or is there a genuine gap in the market: do connectivity options even exist for small to medium sized companies who require periodic access to good value, high speed connectivity of a kind suited to the movement of large video files? What should a well-informed, adaptable production company do in 2017 to become well connected?